Nietzsche on the “Death of God”

Friedrich Nietzsche is one of the most misunderstood and confusing philosophers of modernity.  A rebel against historicism and Hegelianism, he was nevertheless a radical historicist and Hegelian in his own right.  A critic of Christianity (specifically the Catholic version), his own metaphysics and philosophy mirror that of traditional forms of Catholicism.  A humanist and anti-nihilist, … Continue reading Nietzsche on the “Death of God”

Islamic Theology, Philosophy, and Theodicy

Within the context of Western philosophy, Islamic philosophy is generally added to replace “Orthodox” philosophy in the geographic sense. For various reasons I don’t want to get into, students of Western philosophy generally study Islamic philosophy ca. 8th century-Reformation, or at the very least, are given some familiarity with the most important Islamic philosophers during … Continue reading Islamic Theology, Philosophy, and Theodicy

Augustine on the Nature of Evil

Although Confessions is long-winded prayer and an autobiography, Confessions is also a work of profound philosophical and psychological importance.  The first half of Confessions roughly deals with anthropology, the tension between desire and reason, and the need for reason to order desire to achieve what desire seeks.  The second half of Confessions shifts to a more philosophical and theological commentary, which includes Augustine’s … Continue reading Augustine on the Nature of Evil

Typology and Logos in the Gospel of John

The opening prologue of the gospel of St. John is theologically rich, puzzling, and poetic, thereby imbuing it with rich symbolism and imagery. The declaration that “In the beginning was the Word…[and] through him was life, and that life was the light of all humanity. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it” (Jn. 1:1-5), … Continue reading Typology and Logos in the Gospel of John

Becoming Mortal: The Humanization of Achilles in “The Iliad”

As some might know, I frequently write essays on Homer and his greatest song—The Iliad—and am in process of completing a manuscript on The Iliad as a cosmic love song that laid the foundations for the birth of humanism in Western civilization. “Rage—Goddess—sing the rage of Peleus’ son Achilles.” Perhaps only the opening lines of … Continue reading Becoming Mortal: The Humanization of Achilles in “The Iliad”

Islam, Islamism, and the Crisis of the Political

Is Islam a political threat? That might depend on where you live. Is there a distinction between Islam and Islamism. Some say yes. Others say no. Naive leftists who are anti-political (in the Schmittian sense) believe the universal ark of fraternity triumphs over the tribalisms of politics. The boisterous liberal right, spearheaded by anti-religious libertarians … Continue reading Islam, Islamism, and the Crisis of the Political

Jean Paul Sartre: Being and Nothingness

Jean Paul Sartre was among the most famous of the modern existentialists and phenomenologists, perhaps second only to Martin Heidegger.  Sartre’s great text of fame was his “essay on ontology,” Being and Nothingness.  In typical French fashion, the text is weighty, dense, and draws heavily from the history of philosophy, especially Christianity, Bacon, Descartes, Hegel, Husserl, … Continue reading Jean Paul Sartre: Being and Nothingness

Dialectic and the Wisdom of Listening: Reflections on the Book of Job

“You’re not listening.”  This simple phrase is one of the most cliché, but poignantly true, sentences concerning human existence.  Just a Kohelet stated that there is time for everything under the sun, it is important, then, to know when the time is to speak and when the time is to listen.  This is especially true … Continue reading Dialectic and the Wisdom of Listening: Reflections on the Book of Job