Augustine on the Nature of Evil

Although Confessions is long-winded prayer and an autobiography, Confessions is also a work of profound philosophical and psychological importance.  The first half of Confessions roughly deals with anthropology, the tension between desire and reason, and the need for reason to order desire to achieve what desire seeks.  The second half of Confessions shifts to a more philosophical and theological commentary, which includes Augustine’s … Continue reading Augustine on the Nature of Evil

Becoming Mortal: The Humanization of Achilles in “The Iliad”

As some might know, I frequently write essays on Homer and his greatest song—The Iliad—and am in process of completing a manuscript on The Iliad as a cosmic love song that laid the foundations for the birth of humanism in Western civilization. “Rage—Goddess—sing the rage of Peleus’ son Achilles.” Perhaps only the opening lines of … Continue reading Becoming Mortal: The Humanization of Achilles in “The Iliad”

Identity, Love, and Redemption in a Galaxy Far, Far Away

Love gives us the strength to stand up to the dark powers of machines, technology, and militarized science. How does Star Was “deal with the reaction of human beings to changes in science and technology?” It affirms that most intimate, human, and divine reality: Love will redeem the world and provide us a home in the midst … Continue reading Identity, Love, and Redemption in a Galaxy Far, Far Away

Love, Sex, Sacrifice, and Salvation: A Critical Analysis of Sci-Fi Filmography

The Enlightenment mythology usually goes something like this: Humans had been wallowing in darkness and superstition for a long time, then, sometime in the seventeenth century, a few heroic philosophers and proto-scientists broke the chains of religion and freed humanity from the darkness and superstition that had ensnared them since Neolithic times and the more … Continue reading Love, Sex, Sacrifice, and Salvation: A Critical Analysis of Sci-Fi Filmography

Literary Tales Ep. 10: Shakespeare’s “Antony and Cleopatra”

In this lecture of literary tales we explore Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra, principally in Shakespeare's dialectic of the coldness of politics (embodied by Ocatvian/Augustus Caesar) and the rapturous ecstasy of love (embodied by our titular tragic protagonists Antony and Cleopatra). This lecture explores the theme of love and politics (covered in this lecture) in fuller … Continue reading Literary Tales Ep. 10: Shakespeare’s “Antony and Cleopatra”

Literary Tales Ep. 9: Shakespeare on Love & War

In this half hour lecture of Literary Tales, we explore William Shakespeare's thematic dialectical contrast of love and war, primarily through his plays Henry V and Richard III. Continuing, somewhat, from our exploration of Shakespeare's contrast of love and politics, we return to the theme of power (politics) vs. love (self-giving, life-giving, and flesh uniting). … Continue reading Literary Tales Ep. 9: Shakespeare on Love & War

Love, Forgiveness, and “The Iliad”

“For all the battle scenes, violent sex, and rage that fills [The Iliad], the most memorable scenes in the poem are moments of love—especially loving moments of embrace.” Befitting Holy Week, here is an essay of mine concerning the themes of love and forgiveness in the very source of Western literature: The Iliad. Deconstructing Homer's … Continue reading Love, Forgiveness, and “The Iliad”

Dialectic and the Wisdom of Listening: Reflections on the Book of Job

“You’re not listening.”  This simple phrase is one of the most cliché, but poignantly true, sentences concerning human existence.  Just a Kohelet stated that there is time for everything under the sun, it is important, then, to know when the time is to speak and when the time is to listen.  This is especially true … Continue reading Dialectic and the Wisdom of Listening: Reflections on the Book of Job