Book News

Great news everyone, the manuscript which I was a contributor for has passed the referring with Lexington Press (U.S.). It will be published in the Fall of 2019 under the title: The College Lecture Today: An Interdisciplinary Defense for the Contemporary University. I have a chapter examining the pedagogy of the religious lecture examining the … Continue reading Book News

Introduction to Plato: Oriental Platonism

Many people have likely come across the idea of Oriental Platonism? Oriental Platonism has a long history which is deeply intricate related to many factors: Aryanism, Indo-Europeanism, and other mystical anthropologies which rose to prominence in the late nineteenth century. While I will likely deal with this subject in fuller detail at some time in … Continue reading Introduction to Plato: Oriental Platonism

Aquinas and the Ladder of Being

St. Thomas Aquinas is one of the most recognizable names in Christian history and the Christian intellectual tradition. While generally held up as the perennial philosopher in the Catholic tradition, especially among Catholic realists, he is also loved—perhaps begrudgingly—by many in the Protestant world especially the so-called Reformed scholastics. There is also a lot of … Continue reading Aquinas and the Ladder of Being

Aesthetics, Morality, Spirituality and the Ecological Crisis

Conservation is at the heart of conservatism. And the root of our contemporary ecological crisis is a careless, profligate mode of relating to the world; Francis Bacon would be proud of our current disposition as tormentors of nature. Conservatism’s stance toward the natural world, and the ecological crisis, sets it apart from the other philosophies … Continue reading Aesthetics, Morality, Spirituality and the Ecological Crisis

Nihilism, Video Games, and the Art of Aesthetical Immersion: Or Why “Life is Strange” Was an Amazing Game

Later this year, my contribution to an anthology on pedagogy dealing with narrative and persona immersion in religion should be published. Drawing on St. Augustine, Carl Jung, Joseph Campbell, and Walter Ong, I was arguing that the special relationship between religion, orality, and the synthetic relationship between the monomyth to the human psyche, will ensure … Continue reading Nihilism, Video Games, and the Art of Aesthetical Immersion: Or Why “Life is Strange” Was an Amazing Game

Roger Scruton’s Lebenswelt: A Review of “The Soul of the World”

Roger Scruton is one of the most eminent English-speaking philosophers; a scholar in aesthetics, political philosophy, Spinoza, and Kant (and subsequently Kantianism and post-Kantianism), he is a well-known conservative in the proper sense and use of the term.  A skeptic toward market fundamentalism, a critic of the faux virtue and “care” pretentiously claimed in socialism, … Continue reading Roger Scruton’s Lebenswelt: A Review of “The Soul of the World”

Augustine’s City of God, II: What was the Cause of Rome’s “Greatness” (Part I)

The sack of Rome prompted pagan critics of Christianity to charge that it was the adoption of Christianity which led to Rome’s upheaval and tragic sacking at the hands of Alaric.  These critics charged that if Rome had stayed true to their old gods then those gods would have looked over Rome and sparred her … Continue reading Augustine’s City of God, II: What was the Cause of Rome’s “Greatness” (Part I)

Augustine’s City of God, I: Origins and Cultural Critique

Saint Augustine of Hippo is arguably the most influential Christian philosopher and theologian who ever lived.  This is not to say he is unique among Christians; several of his writings reaffirmed already prevailing orthodoxy from the first through fourth century church fathers.  However, his reading of the Scriptures—especially Saint Paul—his theological anthropology (concerning the human … Continue reading Augustine’s City of God, I: Origins and Cultural Critique

Athens, Jerusalem, and Leftwing Politics

Leo Strauss was famous for his reading of Western culture, history, and politics as a division between Athens and Jerusalem. Borrowing from the Christian philosopher and theologian Tertullian, who famously bemused “What has Athens got to do with Jerusalem?”, Strauss recontextualized the question and thesis of Tertullian as one of oppositional antagonism which, nevertheless, is … Continue reading Athens, Jerusalem, and Leftwing Politics